In 1963, [Philip K.] Dick won the Hugo Award for The Man in the High Castle. Although he was hailed as a genius in the science fiction world, the mainstream literary world was unappreciative, and he could publish books only through low-paying science fiction publishers such as Ace. Even in his later years, he continued to have financial troubles.

In the introduction to the 1980 short story collection The Golden Man, Dick wrote: “Several years ago, when I was ill, [Robert] Heinlein offered his help, anything he could do, and we had never met; he would phone me to cheer me up and see how I was doing. He wanted to buy me an electric typewriter, God bless him—one of the few true gentlemen in this world. I don’t agree with any ideas he puts forth in his writing, but that is neither here nor there. One time when I owed the IRS a lot of money and couldn’t raise it, Heinlein loaned the money to me. I think a great deal of him and his wife; I dedicated a book to them in appreciation. Robert Heinlein is a fine-looking man, very impressive and very military in stance; you can tell he has a military background, even to the haircut. He knows I’m a flipped-out freak and still he helped me and my wife when we were in trouble. That is the best in humanity, there; that is who and what I love.”

Notes:
The above passage is adapted from the Wikipedia entry on Philip K. Dick ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_k_dick )

The movies “Blade Runner” ,”Total Recall” and “Minority Report” were based on Philip K. Dick stories. Robert Heinlein is considered one of the grand masters of science fiction. His work includes: “Starship Troopers”, “The Puppet Masters” and “Strangers in a Strange Land”.