There is an interesting book by William Goldman called Adventures in the Screen Trade.  Goldman is a novelist and a screenwriter, known for such films as All The President’s Men, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Princess Bride and Misery.

Much of the book is about his experiences in Hollywood, but at the end he gives a practical example of how to take a story and turn it into a movie script.  The story is one he wrote about a couple barbers.  He asked his colleague, George Roy Hill (director of such films as All The President’s Men, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, The Sting and Slapshot), to critique it.

George Roy Hill had a problem with one of the barbers.  This barber was a genius, but also a jerk.  Since he didn’t like the perpetuation of this stereotype, he wrote:

“The people I’ve known with the greatest artistic integrity are usually the most professional and most considerate, while I’ve unfortunately run into a few second-rate artists who behave like s**** in the belief that this somehow automatically endows them with talent and integrity.”

I don’t have anything to add to that, except to agree.

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